Image Courtesy of Kode for Klossy

Photo: Courtesy of Flatiron School/Kode with Klossy

Wanting to help close the coding gap between men and women, Karlie Kloss, founder of Kode with Klossy — and, yes, a fashion model — is expanding her initiative’s girls-only free summer coding camp (girls 13-18) and now offering young women 18+ the Kode with Klossy Career Scholarship, aimed at young women who want to jump-start their careers in code.

“Tech touches everything today,” Kloss tells USA TODAY College in an email.

“The Career Scholarship, which will provide women with access to an intensive nine-month program, is about engaging women who are ready to start a promising career in tech,” she says. “They both address the access to coding pipeline in important and unique ways.”

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Photo: Courtesy of Flatiron School/Kode with Klossy

The program, which will be done online at learn.co, part of the New York City-based Flatiron School, aims to give women the opportunity to learn coding languages, build a robust code portfolio on GitHub, and experience building Web apps — both independently and with others in the program. At the program’s end, participants will be able to apply for an apprenticeship with one of Kode with Klossy’s professional partners.

Applications for the Career Scholarship open Wednesday, May 25, and applicants will be accepted on a rolling basis, with one scholarship winner selected every month. With no prerequisite requirements, the program aims to bolster any and all who are passionate about code.

“We’re looking for women who are driven, curious, and creative. You don’t need to already have a background in coding to apply,” says Kloss, whose interest in coding took off when she took classes at the Flatiron School. “We want to see applicants who are excited about tech, eager to learn, and ready to kick-start a new career path.”

Kode with Klossy continues its Summer Code Camp for girls this year in New York, Los Angeles, and St. Louis. The two-week program teaches software engineering principles and fundamentals of the coding languages behind Web apps like Twitter.

Acceptance into the program required applicants to make a 60-second short video explaining how they plan to use their “coding superpowers to change the world” with the hashtag #KodeWithKlossy. The results for Summer ’16 were adorable, creative, and inspiring. Here are some examples:

“Last year, we had students build reading apps, virtual closets, and weather detection technology. I can’t wait to see what the young women create this year,” Kloss says. “I’m in awe of these girls.”